What Are the Different Types of 3D Goggles?

All types of 3D glasses can be divided into two categories: passive and active.

Active glasses interact wirelessly with images on a screen to enhance 3D viewing, whereas passive glasses do not. Passive ones have been around since three-dimensional viewing first arrived in the 1920s, and they are themselves divided into two major subcategories: anaglyphic and polarized glasses.

The different types of 3D goggles include red and blue glasses, polarized lenses, shutter glasses, and personal viewers. These products require the use of a 3D image to function properly, whether a movie, television, or computer image that is designed to appear in 3D. They may be purchased at specialty electronics stores or through Internet ordering.

3D imaging works by presenting the brain with two images of the same thing taken from slightly different angles. The brain then resolves these two images into one single picture that gives the illusion of coming up off of the page, or out of a movie screen. The most commonly used form of 3D goggles which makes this technology possible are viewing glasses coded with a red lens and a blue lens. The corresponding images meant to be viewed using these goggles provide two separate pictures, one outlined in red, and the other in a contrasting color, like blue. These two differently colored pictures can be seen with the naked eye separately, however, when viewed through the color filters of the glasses which only allows one picture to enter each eye, they merge into one page-popping image.

Updated versions of these original 3D goggles use polarized lenses instead of color differentiated ones. Red and blue lenses limit the amount of color that can be transmitted through each lens, causing the filmed images to lose some of their clarity. Polarized lenses can achieve the same effect of only allowing one type of image to enter each eye, but through corresponding image polarization rather than color differentiation. These glasses are typically styled to resemble thick, plastic sun glasses, and each lens is somewhat tinted or opaque in appearance.
Is Amazon actually giving you the best price? This little known plugin reveals the answer.

This image differentiation can be achieved in shutter styled 3D goggles without using image overlays. Shutter glasses are clear LED lenses which are blacked out separately from one another in a sequence. This allows each eye to see only one image at a time, allowing the brain to make the connections without risking the potential for image blurring which can occur with overlays. The sequencing is synchronized with the viewing content using a signal emitter attached to the 3D viewing device.

A personal 3D view screen may also be considered a type of 3D goggles. This headset is designed to sit over both the ears and the eyes, providing full picture and sound in high definition. Each eye lens of the goggles provides unique content, allowing the image overlay technology of 3D to be rendered for the user. These goggles may also be referred to as OLEDs, which stands for the organic light emitting diodes inside the glasses which make the pictures possible.

Once the user has placed these 3D goggles on, he may view television shows or movies in high definition or 3D privately. A virtual screen is created inside the goggles that appears to the user in a manner similar to a projection screen movie. Images may give the illusion of coming out of the screen towards the user, depending on the way in which the content was filmed. The goggles surround the head and may extend between six and eight inches (15.24 to 20.32 centimeters) beyond the face when worn.

Is Amazon actually giving you the best price? This little known plugin reveals the answer.

On a simpler scale, Pulfrich glasses can also create a 3D effect, but only with objects moving across the viewer’s plane of vision. These glasses have one completely transparent lens, and another that is heavily tinted. As an object moves across the visionary plane, the image is immediately transmitted to the eye through the transparent lens, but the tinted lens causes a slight delay. This delay causes the brain to add more depth to the image, creating somewhat of a 3D effect.

All types of 3D glasses can be divided into two categories: passive and active. Active glasses interact wirelessly with images on a screen to enhance 3D viewing, whereas passive glasses do not. Passive ones have been around since three-dimensional viewing first arrived in the 1920s, and they are themselves divided into two major subcategories: anaglyphic and polarized glasses.

Practically anyone who has ever seen a 3D movie is familiar with anaglyph glasses, which feature a combination of red and blue lenses. Anaglyphic 3D works by projecting two identical but slightly offset images on a screen, each image tinted with a different color. To the naked eye, an anaglyphic image appears blurry, with reddish and bluish hues. The glasses use color-filtering lenses to target one image to the right eye, and another to the left; the result is that each eye sees a different image, but the mind is tricked into believing it sees only one. The mind compensates for this by focusing in between the two offset images and blending them into one, which creates an illusion of depth.

Passive polarized glasses operate on the same basis as anaglyph glasses, only they filter light waves rather than color. Again, two identical and slightly offset images are superimposed, except in this case each image is polarized to project light differently than the other. With polarized 3D glasses, each eye only processes one image. Again, however, the mind is tricked into blending the two images into one, creating a 3D experience. Unlike anaglyphic 3D, which can be projected from any screen, polarization 3D works best with screens able to relay different light frequencies without sacrificing picture quality.

 

referensi artikel:

-https://www.easytechjunkie.com/what-are-the-different-types-of-3d-glasses.htm

-https://www.easytechjunkie.com/what-are-the-different-types-of-3d-glasses.htm

Share Me On
Get Code

  • Your's IP : 3.239.4.127
  • Country: United States
  • City :Ashburn
  • Long : 39.0438 | Lat : -77.4874
  • Timezone : America/New_York
  • ISP: Amazon Technologies Inc.